Spirituality and Martial Arts

On November 14, the students, faculty and staff of UTS' main campus in Barrytown gathered at the Auditorium in order to hold the customary Wednesday chapel service.

Master of Divinity student, Ravil Kayumov, first introduced the relationship between Spirituality and Martial Arts, and then proceeded to have everyone in the room try their luck at chopping a wodden board in half with their bare hand.

An excerpt from chapel service:

"The ideal of Martial Arts is usually seen as one’s training for the purpose of self defense and spiritual cultivation. Both of these aspects are interconnected, yet can be separated as physical and spiritual respectively.

In Unification Theology when dealing with the relationship between mind and body, the mind is always seen as subject and the body as the object. That is, there is no democracy between mind and body – it is master-and-servant relationship, where mind is the master and the body is the servant. When these positions are reversed, one’s life becomes a life of selfish gratification, indulgency and corruption.

We have gathered you today not to teach you anything, but rather to share briefly the value of Martial Arts for personal spiritual cultivation, and help you to experience that even for the short time.

In order to defeat external evils, one should learn how to defeat evil impulses within oneself. These evil impulses, also known as sinful or fallen nature, can be seen as barriers that separate as from God and His ideal for us. From the view point of internal feelings, these barriers can be seen as something that we should have done, but in fact did not do; or we did something that we should never have done.

So, we are here today to experience the joy of breaking through our inner limitations, inner barriers through Martial Art technique of board breaking."

FAIR USE NOTICE: This webpage contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of recent trends in faith and culture for the purpose of promoting interfaith understanding.

We understand this constitutes a 'fair use' of such material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.